Ghost in the Shellcode: fuzzy (Pwnage 301)

Hey folks, It's a little bit late coming, but this is my writeup for the Fuzzy level from the Ghost in the Shellcode 2014 CTF! I kept putting off writing this, to the point where it became hard to just sit down and do it. But I really wanted to finish before PlaidCTF 2014, which […]

Ghost in the Shellcode: gitsmsg (Pwnage 299)

"It's Saturday night; I have no date, a 2L bottle of Shasta, and my all-rush mix tape. Let's rock!" ...that's what I said before I started gitsmsg. I then entered "Rush" into Pandora, and listened to a mix of Rush, Kansas, Queen, Billy Idol, and other 80's rock for the entire level. True story. Anyway, […]

Ghost in the Shellcode: TI-1337 (Pwnable 100)

Hey everybody, This past weekend was Shmoocon, and you know what that means—Ghost in the Shellcode! Most years I go to Shmoocon, but this year I couldn't attend, so I did the next best thing: competed in Ghost in the Shellcode! This year, our rag-tag band of misfits—that is, the team who purposely decided not […]

In-depth malware: Unpacking the ‘lcmw’ Trojan

Hey folks, Happy New Year, and welcome to 2014! On a recent trip to Tyson's Corner, VA, I had some time to kill, so I took a careful look at a malware sample that a friend of mine sent to me some time ago, which I believe he originally got off somebody else's hosed system. […]

ropasaurusrex: a primer on return-oriented programming

One of the worst feelings when playing a capture-the-flag challenge is the hindsight problem. You spend a few hours on a level—nothing like the amount of time I spent on cnot, not by a fraction—and realize that it was actually pretty easy. But also a brainfuck. That's what ROP's all about, after all! Anyway, even […]

Epic “cnot” Writeup (highest value level from PlaidCTF)

When I was at Shmoocon, I saw a talk about how to write an effective capture-the-flag contest. One of their suggestions was to have a tar-pit challenge that would waste all the time of the best player, by giving him a complicated challenge he won't be able to resist. In my opinion, in PlaidCTF, I […]

Battle.net authentication misconceptions

Hey everybody, There have been a lot of discussion and misconceptions about Battle.net's authentication lately. Having done a lot of work on the Battle.net protocol, I wanted to lay some to rest. The first thing to understand is that, at least at the time I was working on this, there were three different login methods […]

Remote control manager FAIL

Hey guys, Today, I thought it'd be fun to take a good look at a serious flaw in some computer-management software. Basically, the software is designed for remotely controlling systems on networks (for installing updates or whatever). As far as I know, this vulnerability is currently unpatched; there are allegedly mitigations, but you have to […]

A deeper look at ms11-058

Hey everybody, Two weeks ago today, Microsoft released a bunch of bulletins for Patch Tuesday. One of them - ms11-058 - was rated critical and potentially exploitable. However, according to Microsoft, this is a simple integer overflow, leading to a huge memcpy leading to a DoS and nothing more. I disagree. Although I didn't find […]

Locks that can re-key themselves?

Hey everybody, As I'm sure you all know, I normally post about IT security here. But, once in awhile, I like to take a look at physical security, even if it's just in jest. Well, this time it isn't in jest. I was at Rona last week buying a lead/asbestos/mold-rated respirator (don't ask!), when I […]

Watch out for exim!

Hey everybody, Most of you have probably heard of the exim vulnerability this week. It has potential to be a nasty one, and my brain is stuffed with its inner workings right now so I want to post before I explode! First off, if you're concerned that you might have vulnerable hosts, I wrote a […]

Taking apart the Energizer trojan – Part 4: writing a probe

Now that we know what we need to send and receive, and how it's encoded, let's generate the actual packet. Then, once we're sure it's working, we'll convert it into an Nmap probe! In most of this section, I assume you're running Linux, Mac, or some other operating system with a built-in compiler and useful […]

Taking apart the Energizer trojan – Part 3: disassembling

In Part 2: runtime analysis, we discovered some important addresses in the Energizer Trojan -- specifically, the addresses that make the call to recv() data. Be sure to read that section before reading this one. Now that we have some starting addresses, we can move on to a disassembler and look at what the code's […]

Taking apart the Energizer trojan – Part 2: runtime analysis

In Part 1: setup, we infected the system with the Trojan. It should still be running on the victim machine. If you haven't read that section, I strongly recommend you go back and read it. Now that we've infected a test machine, the goal of this step is to experiment a little with the debugger […]

Taking apart the Energizer trojan – Part 1: setup

Hey all, As most of you know, a Trojan was recently discovered in the software for Energizer's USB battery charger. Following its release, I wrote an Nmap probe to detect the Trojan and HDMoore wrote a Metasploit module to exploit it. I mentioned in my last post that it was a nice sample to study […]