Padding oracle attacks: in depth

This post is about padding oracle vulnerabilities and the tool for attacking them - "Poracle" I'm officially releasing right now. You can grab the Poracle tool on Github!

At my previous job — Tenable Network Security — one of the first tasks I ever had was to write a vulnerability check for MS10-070 — a padding oracle vulnerability in ASP.net. It's an interesting use of a padding oracle vulnerability, since it leads to code execution, but this blog is going to be a more general overview of padding oracles. When I needed to test this vuln, I couldn't find a good writeup on how they work. The descriptions I did find were very technical and academic, which I'm no good at. In fact, when it comes to reading academic papers, I'm clueless and easily frightened. But, I struggled through them, and now I'm gonna give you a writeup that even I'd be able to understand!

By the way, the Wikipedia page for this attack isn't very good. If somebody wants to summarize my blog and make it into a Wikipedia page, there's now a source you can reference. :)

On a related note, I'm gonna be speaking at Shmoocon in February: "Crypto: You're doing it wrong". Among other things, I plan to talk about padding oracles and hash extension attacks — I'm really getting into this crypto thing!
Continue reading

What’s going on with SkullSpace (our hackerspace)?

Hey everybody,

This is just a super quick post today to direct you here - http://www.skullspace.ca/blog/2012/11/skullspace-2-0-the-new-frontier/.

That's a post I wrote about SkullSpace - the hackerspace that me and several others helped found a couple years ago. We went down a "too good to be true" road, where we had a ton of space and super cheap rent. And, eventually, got bitten by it. We're in the process of moving, and started a fundraiser to make it happen.

Anyway, read the post! It's interesting. :)

Ron
Continue reading

Everything you need to know about hash length extension attacks

You can grab the hash_extender tool on Github!

(Administrative note: I'm no longer at Tenable! I left on good terms, and now I'm a consultant at Leviathan Security Group. Feel free to contact me if you need more information!)

Awhile back, my friend @mogigoma and I were doing a capture-the-flag contest at https://stripe-ctf.com. One of the levels of the contest required us to perform a hash length extension attack. I had never even heard of the attack at the time, and after some reading I realized that not only is it a super cool (and conceptually easy!) attack to perform, there is also a total lack of good tools for performing said attack! After hours of adding the wrong number of null bytes or incorrectly adding length values, I vowed to write a tool to make this easy for myself and anybody else who's trying to do it. So, after a couple weeks of work, here it is!

Continue reading

Using “Git Clone” to get Pwn3D

Hey everybody!

While I was doing a pentest last month, I discovered an attack I didn't previously know, and I thought I'd share it. This may be a Christopher Columbus moment - discovering something that millions of people already knew about - but I found it pretty cool so now you get to hear about it!

One of the first things I do when I'm looking at a Web app - and it's okay to make a lot of noise - is run the http-enum.nse Nmap script. This script uses the http-fingerprints.lua file to find any common folders on a system (basically brute-force browsing). I'm used to seeing admin folders, tmp folders, and all kinds of other interesting stuff, but one folder in particular caught my eye this time - /.git.
Continue reading

Battle.net authentication misconceptions

Hey everybody,

There have been a lot of discussion and misconceptions about Battle.net's authentication lately. Having done a lot of work on the Battle.net protocol, I wanted to lay some to rest.

The first thing to understand is that, at least at the time I was working on this, there were three different login methods (this is before they combined the Web logins with Battle.net logins - I can't speak on those). The three methods are:

  1. CHAT protocol - deprecated a long, long time ago
  2. Old Login System (OLS) - used by Diablo, Warcraft 2 BNE, Starcraft, and Diablo II
  3. New Login System (NLS) - used by Warcraft 3, World of Warcraft, and in some fashion by newer games. Also supported - but unused - by Diablo II

I'll describe, in detail, how each of these work. The summary is, though, that at no point does a game client ever send a plaintext password to the server. The closest is the SHA1 of the password, which is used for account creation in old games. For more information, read on!
Continue reading

Remote control manager FAIL

Hey guys,

Today, I thought it'd be fun to take a good look at a serious flaw in some computer-management software. Basically, the software is designed for remotely controlling systems on networks (for installing updates or whatever). As far as I know, this vulnerability is currently unpatched; there are allegedly mitigations, but you have to pay to see them! (A note to vendors - making us pay for your patches or mitigation notes only makes your customers less secure. Please stop doing that!)

This research was done in the course of my work at Tenable Network Security on the Reverse Engineering team. It's an awesome team to work on, and we're always hiring (for this team and others)! If you're interested and you have mad reverse engineering skillz, or any kind of infosec skillz, get in touch with me privately! (rbowes-at-tenable-dot-com if you're interested in applying)
Continue reading

A deeper look at ms11-058

Hey everybody,

Two weeks ago today, Microsoft released a bunch of bulletins for Patch Tuesday. One of them - ms11-058 - was rated critical and potentially exploitable. However, according to Microsoft, this is a simple integer overflow, leading to a huge memcpy leading to a DoS and nothing more. I disagree.

Although I didn't find a way to exploit this vulnerability, there's more to this vulnerability than meets the eye - it's fairly complicated, and there are a number of places that I suspect an experienced exploit developer might find a way to take control.

In this post, I'm going to go over step by step how I reverse engineered this patch, figured out how this could be attacked, and why I don't believe the vulnerability is as simple as the reports seem to indicate.

Oh, and before I forget, the Nessus Security Scanner from Tenable Network Security (my employer) has both remote and local checks for this vulnerability, so if you want to check your network go run Nessus now!
Continue reading

Locks that can re-key themselves?

Hey everybody,

As I'm sure you all know, I normally post about IT security here. But, once in awhile, I like to take a look at physical security, even if it's just in jest.

Well, this time it isn't in jest. I was at Rona last week buying a lead/asbestos/mold-rated respirator (don't ask!), when I took a walk down the lock aisle. I'm tired of all my practice locks and was thinking of picking up something interesting. Then I saw it: a lock that advertised that it could re-key itself to any key. Woah! I had to play with it.

Now, maybe I'm an idiot (in fact, my best friends would swear it). But I hadn't ever heard of a lock that can do that before! So I did the obvious thing: I bought it, took it apart, figured out how it worked, then took pictures of everything.
Continue reading

(Mostly) good password resets

Hey everybody!

This is part 3 to my 2-part series on password reset attacks (Part 1 / Part 2). Overall, I got awesome feedback on the first two parts, but I got the same question over and over: what's the RIGHT way to do this?

So, here's the thing. I like to break stuff, but I generally leave the fixing to somebody else. It's just safer that way, since I'm not really a developer or anything like that. Instead, I'm going to continue the trend of looking at others' implementations by looking at three major opensource projects - WordPress, SMF, and MediaWiki. Then, since all of these rely on PHP's random number implementation to some extent, I'll take a brief look at PHP.
Continue reading

Hacking crappy password resets (part 1)

Greetings, all!

This is part one of a two-part blog on password resets. For anybody who saw my talk (or watched the video) from Winnipeg Code Camp, some of this will be old news (but hopefully still interesting!)

For this first part, I'm going to take a closer look at some very common (and very flawed) code that I've seen in on a major "snippit" site and contained in at least 5-6 different applications (out of 20 or so that I reviewed). The second blog will focus on a single application that does something much worse.
Continue reading

Watch out for exim!

Hey everybody,

Most of you have probably heard of the exim vulnerability this week. It has potential to be a nasty one, and my brain is stuffed with its inner workings right now so I want to post before I explode!

First off, if you're concerned that you might have vulnerable hosts, I wrote a plugin for Nessus to help you find them (I'm not sure if it's in the ProfessionalFeed yet - if it isn't, it will be soon). There's no Nmap script yet, but my sources tell me that it's in progress (keep an eye on my Twitter account for updates on that).
Continue reading

Faking demos for fun and profit

This week Last week Earlier this month Last month Last year (if this intro doesn't work, I give up trying to post this :) ), I presented at B-Sides Ottawa, which was put on by Andrew Hay and others (and sorry I waited so long before posting this... I kept revising it and not publishing). I got to give a well received talk, meet a lot of great folks, see Ottawa for the first time, and learn that I am a good solid Security D-lister. w00t!

Before I talk about the fun part, where I completely faked out my demo, if you want the slides you can grab them here:
http://svn.skullsecurity.org:81/ron/security/2010-11-bsides-ottawa/. You can find more info about the conference and people's slides at the official site. And finally, here's a picture of me trying to look casual.

B-sides conferences, for those of you who don't know, are awesome little conferences that often (but not always) piggyback on other conferences. They are free (or cheap), run by volunteers, and have raw and technical talks. B-sides Ottawa was no exception, and I'm thrilled I had the chance to not only see it, but take part in it. I really hope to run our own B-sides Winnipeg next year!
Continue reading

Update on my life, conferences, career, etc

Hey all!

It's been awhile since I've written on my blog, and I apologize. I'm at a job now where I actually spend my day working instead of pondering, so it's hard to find time! :)

So, what's new with me?

I'm working on some cool new Nmap stuff right now, so I'm hoping to write about that in the next couple months. Web application fingerprinting isn't something I've seen done much, but I'm hoping Nmap can make some good progress on it with the help of Yokoso, Nikto, and some other resources.
Continue reading

Finding Mapped Drives with Meterpreter

This post written by Matt Gardenghi
---------
This is going to be a series of short "how to" articles so that I have a resource when I forget how I did something. Your benefit from this post is incidental to my desire to have a resource I can reach when I've had a brain cloud.

When cracking into a computer via Metasploit, I often (OK, usually) install meterpreter.  It just makes life simpler.  Well, the other day, I was chatting with @jcran about my inability to get access to network drives on a Novell network.  The problem is that Novell maps drives in a sorta funny method compared to Active Directory. At least that was my thought.  The problem generally is that Novell handles things extremely differently then AD, that I assumed that things would be different.  #facepalm
Continue reading

Followup to my Facebook research

Hey all,

Some of you may have heard what I did this month. It turns out, depending on who you listen to, that I'm either an evil "Facebook hacker" or just some mischievous individual doing "unsettling" research. But, one way or the other, a huge number of people have read or heard this story, and that's pretty cool.

Although it's awesome (and humbling) that so much attention was paid (at least for a couple days) to some fairly straight forward work I did, I want to talk about this from my perspective, including why I did it and what I think this means to the community. Then, for fun, I'll end by talking about other places this research can go and open up the floor for some discussion.
Continue reading

Return of the Facebook Snatchers

First and foremost: if you want to cut to the chase, just download the torrent. If you want the full story, please read on....

Background

Way back when I worked at Symantec, my friend Nick wrote a blog that caused a little bit of trouble for us: Attack of the Facebook Snatchers. I was blog editor at the time, and I went through the usual sign off process and, eventually, published it. Facebook was none too happy, but we fought for it and, in the end, we got to leave the blog up in its original form.

Why do I bring this up? Well last week @FSLabsAdvisor wrote an interesting Tweet: it turns out, by heading to https://www.facebook.com/directory, you can get a list of every searchable user on all of Facebook!

My first idea was simple: spider the lists, generate first-initial-last-name (and similar) lists, then hand them over to @Ithilgore to use in Nmap's awesome new bruteforce tool he's working on, Ncrack.
Continue reading

Information Security For College Students

I've thought about this off and on over the last few years.  Today I noticed that Kees Leune (http://www.leune.org/blog/kees/2010/07/teaching-agai.html) is going to be teaching a class this school year.  He was asking for comments and so here's mine....

I'd like to see a threefold class system.  The first class would entail an overview of the 10 Domains.  The second would be Offensive Security and the third would be Defensive Security.

There is a reason for that ordering.  Without a good understanding of the fundamentals of security (10 domains) the second two classes will have less value.  Understanding the idea of physical security as well as separation of duties and such really support defensive and offensive security.  Defenders are better when they understand the threats.  Therefore, I place Offensive Security before Defensive Security.  But that's preference.  You could teach them together and make it a two-part class (firewall defense/offense; Linux offense/defense and so forth).
Continue reading